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******ANTHEA BELL,TRANSLATOR OF ASTERIX AND KAFKA DIES AGED 82 *****AN ARTS FUNDED PROJECT HEADED BY TRANSLATOR DANIEL HAHN WILL ALLOW 8 EDITORS FROM UK PUBLISHING GO TO BOLOGNA CHILDRENS BOOK FAIR TO SCOUT FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE BOOKS**** NORTHERN IRISH NOVELIST ANNA BURNS WINS THE 2018 MANBOOKERS WITH HER NOVEL MILKMAN***MANBOOKERS SAY 2018 SUBMISSIONS TOO LONG *** Waleed Abulkhair named PEN PINTER INTERNATIONAL WRITER OF COURAGE*** Poland-based kids’ publisher Ameet will release a series of books based on the Wizarding World franchise—encompassing the Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts films—
 

Anthea Bell Translator of Asterix & Kafka Dies at 82

Anthea Bell, the translator who brought classics from Asterix to WG Sebald to an English readership, has died at the age of 82.

Author Samanta  Schweblin

Catch a glimpse of Latin America at a discussion between leading Latin American authors Samanta Schweblin, Laia Jufresa and Giuseppe Caputo. 

Globooks Reviews

www.globooks.net reviews Kenyan author Peter Kimani`s Dance of The Jakaranda published by SAQI .
 

Manbookers 2018 Winner Announced

Anna Burns has become the first Northern Irish writer to win the Man Booker Prize with her novel Milkman (Faber & Faber), a book about the sexual harassment of a young woman, commended by the judges for its “distinctive voice” and for being at once “particular and brilliantly universal”.

Burns claimed the £50,000 prize at the award ceremony at London’s Guildhall on Tuesday evening (16th October).

The book, “a tale of gossip and hearsay, silence and deliberate deafness”, is written from the perspective of a young woman struggling to eschew the unwelcome advances of “the milkman”, a paramilitary predator taking advantage of his power in a divided society recognisable as Belfast during the Troubles.

Praising Burns’ first-person narrative, which ignores standard practices of paragraphing to more closely emulate speech, chair of the judges Kwame Anthony Appiah said he had “never heard a voice like it”, calling it “a completely distinctive voice” written in “language worth savouring”.


Author Wins Adventure Writing Literary Prize

Abir Mukherjee has won the 2018 Wilbur Smith Adventure Writing Prize (£15,000) with his second novel, A Necessary Evil (Vintage). The historical crime tale, set in India in 1920, sees Captain Wyndham and Sergeant Banerjee of the Calcutta Police Force investigate the assassination of a Maharajah's son. 

Niso Smith, founder of The Wilbur & Niso Smith Foundation, which makes the awards, described the book as "an exciting example of how adventure writing can transport you to a different time and place, teach you something new, and truly allow you to lose yourself in a story."

Mukherjee said of his win:  “I’m thrilled to have been awarded the Wilbur Smith Adventure Writing Prize. It’s an honour for me to have had my work selected from a shortlist of such wonderful and talented authors. The Wilbur and Niso Smith Foundation do so much to support young writers and further the promotion of literacy around the world, and I hope to work closely with the Foundation to help further these goals and advance adventure writing as a genre.”


Inaugral Irish Book Week Launches Programme

The  inaugural Irish Book Week has unveiled its nationwide programme, featuring authors including Donal Ryan and John Boyne (pictured).

Running from 27th October to 3rd November, the week-long celebration of Irish books and bookshops is a collaboration between Bookselling Ireland and Publishing Ireland. The events focus on Irish books and the role bookshops play in Irish society and culture, aiming to encourage people into their local bookshop..

Events include a Halloween themed storytime at WH Smith in Arnotts, Dublin, as well as a conversation with Ryan in Clifden Bookshop (both on 27th October). At Hodges Figgis in Dublin there will be a conversation between Boyne (who recently won the Glass Bell Award) and fellow writer Howard on 1st November, while a reading with YA author Cethan Leahy takes place two days later at Waterstones, Cork.


Elena Ferrante is to write a weekly newspaper column for the Guardian’s new look Weekend magazine starting on Saturday (20th January).

The regular column will cover the pseudonymous Italian novelist’s thoughts “on life, love, childhood, ageing, the female experience and everything in between”. Her inaugural column will focus on her first love.

According to a Guardian report, the author of the bestselling Neapolitan series said she was “attracted to the possibility of testing myself” with a regular column describing the experience “a bold, anxious exercise in writing”. The pieces will be translated by Ferrante’s regular collaborator Ann Goldstein.

The reclusive Italian author’s four-part series, published by Europa Editions, follows Elena Greco and her friend Raffaella Cerullo, who she has always called Lila, in the first year of primary school in 1950. Set against a dangerous and vibrant Naples, the story spans 60 years of their lives as Elena tries to unravel the mystery of her friend. 

The announcement follows the launch of the Guardian in tabloid format on Monday (15th January). In addition to the refreshed Weekend magazine, the paper will also include the Review section revamped as a “beautiful and stylish books magazine”. Other sections include food magazine, Feast, as well as Travel and the listings supplement Guide.

Melissa Denes, editor of Weekend, revealed she was "thrilled to be working with Elena Ferrante on her first newspaper column” and described it as “a new adventure for her and for Guardian Weekend magazine.”

“Every week, she will be writing a personal piece, covering subjects from sex to ageing to the things that make her laugh. I can't wait to see where she will take us," Denes said.

Weekend has been redesigned as part of the Guardian’s move to tabloid format with the first new look issue appearing on Saturday (20th January).

Ece Temelkuram

Q&A event with Turkish author Ece Temelkuran

Turkish author Ece Temelkuran releases her new novel Women Who Blow On Knots. Something of a firebrand who is never afraid of court controversy. We get the inside track on the meaning of the title and what is the definition of home to this nomadic author.

Hiromi Kawakami

Japanese author

In an event organised by Japan Foundation and Foyles Bookshop, fans were able to meet Japanese author Hiromi Kawakami and discuss her novels including Strange Weather In Tokyo. Why is there always a food featured in the novels ? What kind of characters does she enjoy writing about ? Tell me more
 

Author Elif Shafak 

Popular Turkish Author

Prominent foreign fiction authors including popular Turkish author Elif Shafak came together at a recent event to debate the changing perceptions of women, treating us to some real revelations on the night. (Elif Shafak photo inset) Tell me more

Author David Lagercrantz

Meet The Author Event

With the launch of the fourth addition to the Stieg Larsson trilogy The Girl In the Spiders Web, crime fiction aficionados have finally sated their anxiety levels. It`s the trilogy that globally set alight interest in Nordic Noir and arguably reinvigorated the genre, selling over 80 million copies to date. Tell Me More

Fuminori Nakamura 

Popular Japanese Noir Author

Fuminori Nakamura is considered one of the leading crime writers in Japan and is called the new master of ‘Japanese Noir’. Its been said that his works examine of some of the darker element of Japanese society and have netted him many awards such as the Akutagawa prize and the Kenzaburo Oe Prize, Japan’s most prestigious literary award. Tell Me More
 

Jamaican Novelists For Your Reading


Waiting In Vain Colin Channer, Once referred to as ‘Bob Marley with a Pen’, after naming his first two novels after Marley tunes: Waiting in Vain and Satisfy my Soul. He has also become an influential figure within the Caribbean literary world because of his work with the Calabash International Literary Festival Trust..

True History of Paradise
A writer who has helped define Jamaican literature for a new generation, Margaret Cezair-Thompson has won numerous accolades during her career for her perspicacious depictions of Jamaican history and culture.
Her first novel The True History of Paradise follows Jean Landing as she flees her native Jamaica for the USA, and suffers from the homesickness and nostalgia experienced by all exiles. It was shortlisted for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in 2000. Cezair-Thompson's second novel, The Pirate's Daughter is an attempt to depict colonial Jamaica, and was awarded the Essence Literary Award for Fiction 2008.

Pao
A unique voice in Jamaican literature, Kerry Young’s works look at the island’s multicultural society, and particularly focus on the Chinese community amongst which Young herself was raised. Young is the daughter of a Chinese father and a mother of mixed Chinese-African heritage who came to Britain from Jamaica as a young woman
 

In Chinelo Okparanta’s new novel Under the Udala Trees, a chance meeting between Ijeoma, a Christian Igbo, and Amina, a Muslim Hausa, begins a friendship that turns quickly to passion. “This was the beginning,” Okparanta writes. “Our bodies being touched by the fire that was each other’s flesh … Tingly and good and like everything perfect in the world.”

'Nigeria is haunted by Biafran war'

Chinua Achebe's new memoir suggests that his country is still suffering from a refusal to face up to its insalubrious history, says Ike Anya

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Ijeoma’s secure, stable childhood has already unravelled by then. The novel is set in 1968, one year into the Biafran conflict, and Ijeoma’s world is beset by “the ruckus of armored cars and shelling machines, bomber planes and their loud engines sending shock waves through our ears”. Things grow worse. Her father, “a man who liked to wallow in his thoughts”, becomes so consumed by sorrow for his massacred people that he refuses to seek refuge during an air raid over their town of Ojoto. When Ijeoma and her mother Adaora emerge from a nearby bunker, they discover his blood-soaked body.

 

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